Macro Photography of Press Pot Grinds

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Macro Photography of Press Pot Grinds

Postby Mark Prince on Tue Jun 03, 2008 2:44 pm

I was doing a small job photographing some miniatures for a client today, and I decided to shoot some coffee grounds - specifically, press pot grinds. Both used (brewed with) and fresh. The grind is approximately 1200 microns average (I had the grind from the Ditting measured last year at UBC at various settings), the grinder is a Ditting KF804, and some of the shots are 1:1 macros. Interesting stuff. Even though the Ditting is a pressed burr grinder, there's some obviously clean "shears" in the grounds.

Click the picture to see the rest of the images uploaded to Flickr.

Image

I tried doing a HDR version of one of the photos, sucked horribly at it. I've never done HDR before.

Mark
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Re: Macro Photography of Press Pot Grinds

Postby Jason Haeger on Tue Jun 03, 2008 4:17 pm

Fines are unavoidable.
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Re: Macro Photography of Press Pot Grinds

Postby Mark Prince on Tue Jun 03, 2008 4:38 pm

Unless you sift the coffee, yep.

BUT... I've been told (I haven't seen it in person) the big industrial barrel roasters (Dallis Coffee uses these for their press pot "frac paks") do not produce fines. I've seen the finished samples, and there literally are negligible fines in the fracpaks. I don't know if the grinder itself does that, or if they post-sift.

Mark
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Re: Macro Photography of Press Pot Grinds

Postby Jason Haeger on Wed Jun 04, 2008 11:56 am

I really am curious as to how sifting out fines would effect cup quality.

I suspect complexity would be lost, but perhaps clarity would drastically improve.

Mere speculation, of course.
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Re: Macro Photography of Press Pot Grinds

Postby SL28ave on Mon Aug 04, 2008 10:08 am

Jason Haeger wrote:I really am curious as to how sifting out fines would effect cup quality.

I suspect complexity would be lost, but perhaps clarity would drastically improve.

Mere speculation, of course.


I've cupped and I think drip-brewed sifted vs non-sifted, and the sifted was fairly drastically better. With sifted, I believe you should increase the quantity of grounds too.

Try it. An easy way is to shake the dry grounds in a standard paper (ceramic doesn't seem to work at well) coffee cup for a minute to let the fines migrate to the bottom of the cup.
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Re: Macro Photography of Press Pot Grinds

Postby Edwin Martinez on Mon Aug 04, 2008 2:56 pm

Jason I agree with your speculation and Peters comments.

brew time for espresso with fines is seconds
brew time for press with coarse is minutes

so naturally if you have some very coarse or even whole bean in your portafilter, when you pull your shot it is under extracting, or unable to get sufficient TDS for this brew method from the coarse/whole bean, while possibly over extracting the remainder as a result.

so with a press the more unwanted fines you have, the more bitterness. Not bitter flavors you might find in a dark roast, rather natural bitter flavors that are not sweet that shouldn't be extracted from bean. If you want to be clear on the impact few fines have in a press, make a whole press with 100% fines, exagerate the mistake! Some people call this complexity. I call it artificial body as these fine particles or sediment effect the flavor via texture not the taste. This is not something that is relevant to bean, rather brew method.

I had the opportunity to take a close look at this grinder last month http://www.malykke.dk
and I was quite critical about the percentage of fines, certainly more than I typically find out of a new kf804. But you're right Jason,.... there's always fines unless you sift. Time to go practice your speed sifting techniques.

Nice picture Mark!
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