Pourover brewing stations

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Pourover brewing stations

Postby Sandy on Wed Aug 26, 2009 5:59 am

We are considering opening up another (small) coffee area on our campus and i am particularly interested in setting up a manual pourover station.

Curious to know from those of you that offer pourover brewing in your cafes.

What equipment would you recomended, specifically- grinders, water towers, brewing devices (TruBru, Melitta, Porcelain, Ceramic....), bean containers, etc?

again, we will be operating in a small, yet high volume area. experience has shown a steady stream of traffic with an onslaught between classes.

can anyone offer up any pros and cons to running this type of operation?


thanks in advance.

sandy
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Re: Pourover brewing stations

Postby Jim Saborio on Wed Aug 26, 2009 3:17 pm

For cones I'd suggest trying:
Hario v-60 cones
Beehouse drippers
and the Abid / Clever Dripper
One of these will suit you... I know which my favorite is, but I won't bore you with that.

Dosing containers from:
http://www.specialtybottle.com/index.as ... stom&ID=25
The 2 oz flat tins hold 20g whole bean nicely for 6ish hours. I'd strongly recommend offering one size of pour-over. Otherwise you will have to dose and have recipes for each size. Price each coffee differently. People get that instinctively. Makes it easy to plug in CoEs and like goodies.

Water tower:
49th Parallel recommended a Newco tower that has served me well. Can be wired to run on 220 for increased efficiency / faster recovery. LED temp read-out on front makes it easy to set / monitor boiler temp / recovery.

Grinder:
I am using a Ditting KR-805, also recommended by 49th, which is my favorite piece of equipment in the shop. Runs clean, easy to clean.

Pros:
It's dramatic.
It's a better indication of your approach to coffee than latte art.

Cons:
You occasionally will think to yourself: "if only there were some way to automate this process"

In this day and age, I don't know how people can still drink coffee out of air pots.
I can't remember having good coffee out of an airpot, anywhere.
-JIm

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Re: Pourover brewing stations

Postby IanClark on Tue Sep 01, 2009 2:38 pm

I'm sorry to be a negative voice here, but someone's got to point out that:
manual pourover station
+
onslaught between classes
= a very frightening situation if there's no quick serve option available as well. I do believe you can get an awesome 110oz-115oz extraction from a drip brewer if the systems are set up with sufficient care.

If we're defining an onslaught as a sudden lineup of 15-20 people, I would want to make sure I've got one to two gallon batches of coffee ready (only 10-20 typical "medium" cups worth) before the "onslaught" begins. Given that the space is small I doubt there's room for 20 pourovers going at once! Even then, in my somewhat limited experience with manual pourovers I've found it takes a 5-6 minute extraction (method depending) to do justice to a high end coffee. I'd be shocked if most students were willing to wait that long - particularly if they're in between classes.

Apart from that, I think the Abid dripper is awesome! Jim has surely made some excellent recommendations too. I think it's a great idea as a supplement to quick serve =)
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Re: Pourover brewing stations

Postby Sandy on Wed Sep 02, 2009 5:43 am

thanks Jim and Ian.
I appreciate the recomendations and words of caution. i was hoping for an alternative brew station vs.typical airpots (sorry Jim, but that is what we use...)

back to square one, unless there are other alternative methods that one would recomend?
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Re: Pourover brewing stations

Postby IanClark on Wed Sep 02, 2009 7:08 am

Don't be too discouraged... you could always mix the two approaches... if you were to get 6 Abid drippers (for instance) you could easily do a gallon of awesome coffee in 6 minutes and drain them straight into an airpot for quick service. That way you get the show & tell and you don't have to compromise service.
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Re: Pourover brewing stations

Postby Alistair Durie on Wed Sep 02, 2009 3:11 pm

Technivorm Moccamaster would not give you per-cup but "small batch" -- its a relatively open format (we don't bother with the lids) -- the flexibility of using multiple units can keep up if not produce more coffee than a traditional commercial single head drip. Gold filters are a plus.
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Re: Pourover brewing stations

Postby sarah kluth on Thu Sep 03, 2009 9:51 am

Sandy,

You could always make a quick calculation based on your numbers from peak hours and deduce how much of that is brewed coffee.
From there, you can equip yourself with enough pour overs. A yield of 12oz takes 2:30 from the pre-infusion pour to the last drip.
Lining up a bunch of drippers could be fun and there's plenty of ways to make it tasty and timely. Especially if you decide to go with a 35 second, 1-2oz pre-infusion. That will give you proper timing to do a number of them in a row. I've been able to brew three at a time, no problem. Besides, I know you have go-go gadget arms and can do just about anything.

I'd go for it, but just be really confident in your brew specs. A decent cup from an airpot is better than a ill-prepared dripper.
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Re: Pourover brewing stations

Postby Jim Saborio on Thu Sep 03, 2009 3:22 pm

I'd like to echo everything that Sarah said, in case I somehow discouraged you. We have been using specs similar to what she describes with great success. Our four "group" Tru Bru allows us to slam coffees out much faster than you'd think. I think you can have more groups custom made, but you'll need an eight armed barista to make it worthwhile. Please don't hesitate to PM me if you'd like to discuss Comet's experiences.

Ann Arbor loves pour-over. We've had a couple local cafes copy-cat us since we opened five months ago. I think that's a good sign.
-JIm

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Re: Pourover brewing stations

Postby Sandy on Fri Sep 04, 2009 8:45 am

No despair here, rest assured! I value your opinions and experiences greatly!

Generally , how many Barista's does it take to operate a four-brew brew station?
Does it typically take two people running bar- one dosing, grinding and cleaning while another pours and serves or is it feasible for one go-go gatchet type (thanks Sarah) to handle it all?

What's standard clean-up between brews? Dump, rinse, brew, repeat?

Again, i appreciate the feedback- i need to know the pros and cons, the practical and impractical.
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Re: Pourover brewing stations

Postby Michael Phillips on Sun Sep 06, 2009 6:32 pm

On the equipment side, Curtis offers a water tower that actually aerates its contents on a cycle. If your going to put the effort into pour over it is a good idea to trick out every aspect you can.
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Re: Pourover brewing stations

Postby Mark Inman on Wed Sep 09, 2009 10:34 am

Sandy,

We have many customers who have switched their brewed coffee's to Tru Bru only without a dip in efficiency. I would echo Michael's comments about the Curtis water tower as well.....

And as a bonus, here is a quote that is going up on the new Tru Bru Website from one of the masters:

The Tru Bru system is the progression of the barista's craft towards a consistent and continual hand made brewed coffee. The quality and finish of the design is unmatched and the utility of the Tru Bru makes it a pleasure to use on a daily basis.- Jay Caragay- Spro Coffee. Towson, MD
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Re: Pourover brewing stations

Postby aaronblanco on Thu Sep 10, 2009 8:06 am

What size water tower would one need for a four group pourover station in an environment such as the one Sandy describes?
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